Ordinary time: no more

by Demi Prentiss

Pocket watch by Pixabay; Sundial by Jonathan Meyer; Digital watch by energepic.com  – all from Pexels

I am so done with “ordinary time.”  When I was a child, before the “new” Book of Common Prayer (BCP) was adopted nearly 50 years ago, the long, green “learning” seasons had names: “Epiphany” and “Trinity.” Just like for Christmas and Easter, the time after the feast day was considered a season, an extended time to absorb the mystery and the learning signified by the preceding high holy day, so we might live them every day.

Increasingly, in recent years, we Episcopalians have adopted the Roman Catholic nomenclature of “ordinary time” for the period between the Feast of the Epiphany and Ash Wednesday, and between the Feast of Pentecost and the First Sunday of Advent.  The collects for those Sundays are named for “the [ordinal number] Sunday after the Epiphany [or Pentecost].” And those ordinal numbers (first, second, etc.) are the source of the term “ordinary time.”  In this case, “ordinary” isn’t supposed to imply “not special.”

Back in the old, pre-1978 days, we called those green seasons “the season of Epiphany” and “Whitsuntide / Trinity season.” The green seasons were an important part of both the Incarnation cycle and the Resurrection cycle: the purple season of reflection and preparation (Advent / Lent); the white season of celebration (Christmas / Easter); and the green season of growth and incorporation (Epiphany / Trinity). And for me, most important, the green seasons were all about the laity – seasons where practical theology, ministry, outreach, and formation took the lead over contemplation, self-examination, and specialized clergy-focused liturgies.

For me, calling it “ordinary time” seems to minimize those “lay” seasons. It’s easy to lose the idea that in those seasons, we look to manifest Christ’s presence (Epiphany), and recognize the Trinitarian perichoretic dance that draws all of creation into relationship with the Living God.  “Ordinary time” is an “insider term” – it’s focused on what lectionary readings we’re using, rather than what we’re living into. I’m partial to the idea that every day – even in ordinary time – can bring an epiphany, if we’re willing to see God at work everywhere in the world.  I’m convinced that we’re empowered every day – even in ordinary time – by God’s Pentecostal power, so that we can partner with the Holy Spirit’s work in our daily lives. Everyday faith, for people who live in relationship with an extraordinary God. No more “ordinary time.”

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